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Curator

human, 0002356CE

Mid-Anthropocene

Pfizer Breath

c. 21-22 century

 

We can assume this object to have come from the late 21st to early 22nd century, as this was a time of scarcity and competition for resources. Most lived their lives indoors as much as possible, although these cans would suggest that those who were required to be outside for work (some pulses and seaweed were still farmed outdoors), could buy air from earlier times for a short burst of energy and a clear head. However, the price on the can looks too expensive for labourers of this era who were on extremely low wages despite the dangers of highly polluted air, it is possible that these cans were therefore prescribed to essential workers and paid for the companies they worked for. Our charts show that air quality was so bad at this time that life expectancy had almost halved that of the early 21st century.

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artist/creator

Theodora Beck

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Curator

cyborg, far-future

post-Anthropocene

Collectible air cans

Anthropocene

These cans of air collected from various locations were early, handmade-by-human prototypes of those mass-manufactured and put on sale as atmospheric odour sensor stimulants today. The conflicts between humans’ biological need of air breathing and severe air pollution made air cans a necessity for daily outdoor activities. However, before specialised pipelines have been invented a few centuries ago, air canning was a highly professional skill only mastered by very few artisans. Therefore, the rarity of air cans transformed them from daily necessities to valuable collectibles, as the possession of rare or valuable objects was considered as a symbol of status and wealth in human society. Today, air cans have lost their biological functions and social meanings when they were first made. They are witnesses of the evolution of us and our world.

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Curator

species unknown, far-future

post-Anthropocene

Storage containers

Anthropocene

 

We unearthed these empty cans from distant ancient ruins. Their material is a mixture of metal and polymer compounds, and their shape is very similar to our storage tank. No items were found in these storage containers. We have not been able to confirm whether they were originally empty, or if the items stored in the containers failed to preserve due to the passage of time. The storage containers are square with circular rotating lids, so we guess it may be used to contain liquids or solids in small portions. Unrecognizable symbols are affixed to the storage containers, which may be the description of the function, material, etc. recorded by the being at that time these containers were produced.

[translated by Project Curator]

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