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Curator

human, 0002035 C.E.

early-Anthropocene

Emergency survival kit

c. 0002025-0002050 CE

Los Angeles, California

 

The excavated remains of an emergency survival kit, known as "bug out bags" (BOB) or "get out of dodge" (G.O.O.D.) kits. Such kits are assembled in response to extreme perceptions of risk that require pre-emptive action. This includes political and natural disasters, war, famine, pandemics, fire, earthquakes and volcanic eruptions.

 

Excavated from the remains of a fortified enclave in Los Angeles, the object has been dated to 0002027. In addition to damage caused during burial, the object shows evidence of burning, associated with the violent destruction of the surrounding buildings.

 

The Illegal Museum of Beyond has recently given permission for forensic investigations (x-ray imaging and micro excavations) to take place. Please look out for Theatre of Conservation updates on the contents of the kit.

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Curator

Lauren Oya Oliomina (civilian), 0002024

early-Anthropocene

Grab and run pack

0002024 CE

Los Angeles, California

 

I assembled small survival pack: a grab and run pack that can be grabbed when you have to get out of the house fast, containing a hatchet, two small light all metal pots, a few $100 in savings, an old canteen, a plastic bottle (I resolved to keep them clean and full). I packed matches, a full change of clothing, including shoes (in case I get up and run in the night), comb, soap, toothbrush and toothpaste, tampons, toilet paper, bandages, pins, needles, and thread, alcohol, aspirin, couple of spoons and forks, can opener, my pocket knife, packets of acorn flour, dried fruit, roasted nuts and edible seeds, dried milk, and a little sugar and salt, my survival notes, several plastic storage bags (large and small), and a lot of plantable raw seed, my journal, my earth seed notebook, and lengths of clothes line. I stowed all this in a pair of old pillowcases, one inside the other for strength. I rolled the pillowcases into a blanket pack and tied it with some clothesline, so that I could grab it and run without losing things. I made it easy to open the top, so that I could get my journal in and out, change the water to keep it fresh, and less often change the food and check on the seed. The last thing I wanted to find out was that instead of carrying plantable seed or edible food, I've got a load of bugs and worms.

Lauren Oya Oliomina who in 0002024, lives in a protected enclave on the outskirts of a chaotic Los Angeles. It required a pandemic for people to realise that things could change. All that you touch, You change. All that you change, changes you. The only lasting truth Is change.

[Butler, O. 1993. Parable of the Sower.]

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artist/creator

Dean Sully

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Curator

human, future

mid-Anthropocene

Sacrifice objects in worship rituals

c. 0002025-0002050 CE

Los Angeles, California

 

This pack of dusts and ashes is believed to be the residue after an ancestor worship ritual. Human beings used to believe in the existence of soul and afterworld. Therefore, offering the ancestors sacrifices becomes an important part of family life and helps to reinforce the cohesiveness of blood relationship. People in the early Anthropocene would visit the grave of their ancestors on certain days, bringing a variety of sacrifices, from food to clothes, that the dead liked when they were alive. In some regions, people left these sacrifices in front of the tomb, while in other places they tended to burn the sacrifices, as fire was believed to be a force of purification and thus a connection between the secular world and the heavenly afterworld.

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