Curator

human, 2235 CE

mid-Anthropocene

 Golden can of petroleum

2213 C.E.

Taymyr Peninsula, Russia

This gold can of petroleum fuel was produced as a collector’s item for combustion engine enthusiasts in 2213. It is an authenticated sample of petrol from the last commercial oil field in the Russian Arctic in 2032, formulated for use in the Toyota Previa (1990-2019 C.E.), the most sought-after model for vintage car owners. The use of fossil fuel powered car engines has been illegal since 2030. Considered legally as manslaughter, driving or starting a petrol engine was punishable by up to 10 years in prison, whilst in the Netherlands life sentences were handed out as the use of petrol in cars was considered murder. In some countries the act of  car driving has become the activity of an elite criminal cult who meet illegally to drive on non-disclosed privately-owned roads.

The collectors of these cars and the extremely rare fuel, used to gather around the exhausts of the cars and smell the exhaust fumes. The fumes were sometimes inhaled and then used to blow up balloons as trophies. At some of the events they would drink antique brandy, crisps, and other rare snacks.

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Curator

Jimmy the Bird, 2213 CE

mid-Anthropocene

 Gold fuel can

2213 C.E.

Taymyr Peninsula, Russia

From a collection of fuel kept by future car enthusiasts who used to meet illegally to drive on non-disclosed private lands.

Limited edition exotic rare fuel kept in small gold cans (similar size to the now-illegal tins of tomatoes) were used to drive preserved 21st century cars like the Toyota Previa, Vauxhall Zafira and the Volkswagen Sharan, which at the time were being sold in excess of 7.5 million U.S. dollars with limited edition cans of fuel being sold for 20,000 dollars.

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artist/creator

JImmy Loizeau

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Curator

human, 2035 C.E.

early-Anthropocene

Golden can of petroleum

2032

Taymyr Peninsula, Russia

This gold can of petroleum was produced as a collector’s item for oil enthusiasts. Perhaps it was introduced to promote the use of fossil fuels by corporations, after falling out of favour due their environmental implications. This extravagant item glorifies the resource of petroleum, and therefore may have been part of the climate change-denial campaign, a movement circulated by fossil fuel manufacturers and governments to continue consumption of finite natural resources despite their harmful effects on the environment and global communities.

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