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Cans of human meat

The hyper mono-speciation of human global population and the excess consumption and exploitation of Late-Capitalism, resulted in too many people, living too long, with too few sustainable food sources. This challenged established moral choices associated with consuming flesh from animals. A catastrophic reduction of biodiversity raised concerns about the marginalisation of non-human and non-animate agents, increasing pan species empathy demanded a reconsideration and de-centering of human exceptionalist illusions. Utilising the profusion human meat as an abundant protein source, became an inevitable sustainable solution to cohabiting our world as a good neighbour.

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Curator

human, future

mid-Anthropocene

Curator

human, future

mid-Anthropocene

Hoard of human meat cans

c. 21st century C.E.

This large hoard (only a small selection presented here) was excavated from an underground storage/tomb feature. The site was initially interpreted as a burial crypt, which revealed individual human burial practice within grouped categories; possibly kin groups, charism septs, belief sects,  religious cults, etc. Translations of the text inscribed on the labels suggested however that this was a stored food reserve containing commercially produced human meat for human consumption. The scale of the hoard shows that groups of humans were able to accumulate excess resources even through extended periods of violent anarchy in the Dark Ages of the early-Anthropocene.

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Curator

human, 0002035 CE

early-Anthropocene

Hoard of human meat cans

c. 21st century C.E.

Due the size of the excavated hoard, the Trustees of the Illegal Museum of Beyond  (as is consistent with its Collection and Disposal Policy) are able to offer duplicates of their original,  authentic, excavated individual finds for sale. Please visit our online Museum Shop for a click-and-collect merch service

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Commercially-produced human meat product

The routine consumption of human meat as a commercially available food, highlights the un-sustainability of contemporary human consumption non-human animal meat. The dual impact of global livestock farming and increased prevalence of wild meat consumption can be seen in the consequences of climate crisis and zoonotic pandemics.

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Curator

human, 0002020 CE

early-Anthropocene

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Curator

Frederick O'Brien, 0001919 CE

Holocene

Long Pig

0001919

French Polynesia

Processed from prime human red muscle tissue.

 

"aristocratic appetites for the swinish multitude", "The long pig that speaks". Papua New Guinea term for human flesh, from 'puaa oa', originating in Marquesan to refer to cannibalism.

"Upon it once stood the temple and about it were enacted the rites of mystery, when the priests and elders fed on the 'long pig that speaks,' when the drums beat till dawn and wild dances maddened the blood."

[O’Brien, F., 1919. White Shadows in the South Seas. Travelogue of French Polynesia.]

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Curator

human, far-future

late-Anthropocene

Hoard of canned human meat

Human, live. Human meat, food. Die, eat, more survive, more good. Can, last long. Human meat can, more long. Long can, long life, long human, more human. No waste, waste bad. Human meat can good. Nature, mother, god, rule. Human, follow nature. Simple, good. No simple, bad. Good, good. No good, bad. Eat, live, long human, more human, good. Human meat can, good. Good eat, good live, good human. Simple, long, good.

Note: The chasm between our lingua franca and the language used by the future curators has become a main obstacle for us to translate and understand the interpretation text they have provided. From our endeavour, though, we may infer that the future curators generally believe the canned human meat is a valuable source of food. It seems that they do not have any ethical concerns about consuming human meat, as their societal philosophy follows the primitive laws of nature.

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Curator

human, 0002020 CE

early-Anthropocene

Branded human meat product

c. early 20th century CE

Probably from Australia

Cannibalism is a rare occurrence in contemporary society and is generally considered to be a barbaric act. In the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, cannibalism was known to take place in certain tribal communities, particularly in the Oceanic region (Melanesia, Papau New Guinea, Australia, Polynesia and New Zealand), but also in worldwide indigenous communities. This can of human meat is unusual, as it represents a commercialised version for human consumption. The fact that the label is written in English implies that it was marketed in an English-speaking colony, perhaps when food was scarce, and the British Army adopted the cuisine of local communities. This rare find has prompted research to uncover more detailed information of the dark side of the history of British colonialism.

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Curator

Jonathan Swift, 0001729 CE

Holocene

A Good Fat Child

0001729

Ireland

Fore/hind quarter, a most delicious nourishing and wholesome food, whether stewed, roasted, baked,  boyled, a fricassée, or a ragout. A well nurs’d year old child rendered for a good table offered in sale to persons of quality throughout the kingdom, preventing a burden to parents and country, making them beneficial to the publick.

‘People are the riches of a nation’

[Swift, J., 1729. A modest proposal for preventing the children of poor people from being a burden to their parents or country, and for making them beneficial to the publick.]

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Curator

human, 0002022 CE

early-Anthropocene

Soylent Green

0002022

New York, United States

Human protein block rendered human tissues included: low brain and spinal cord certified treatments (injected with Anti-hominid spongiform encephalopathy prions (A-HSEP).

 

Full Compliance Protocols Mandated
Individual Informed consent secured for person remains to be consumed as part of a mass production system for human meat. Mechanisms for systemic selective de-humanisation, selective extraction of personality traits, theological ritual application, etc., are universal justification process compliant.  

[Harrison, H., 1966. Make Room! Make Room!]

In 0002022, overpopulation, pollution and climate catastrophe have caused global starvation. “Soylent Green" provides a supply of protein, advertised as being made from ocean plankton, but the oceans can longer sustain plankton. Human meat is replaced as the source that links the euthanasia centres to recycling plants, where human corpses are converted into Soylent Green. “Soylent Green is people!"

[Fleischer, R., 1973. Soylent Green. (film)]

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Curator

human, 0002035 CE

early-Anthropocene

Hufu
A tofu based meat substitute, 
the healthy human flesh alternative for cannibals who want to quit. 

find out more at http://eathufu.com/

artist/creator

Dean Sully

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Take a little piece of the future home with you!

Find products related to this exhibit for sale in our museum shop.

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